Impact Evaluation of Community Advocacy Forums (Barazas) in Uganda

Publication Details

3ie Funded Evaluation, PW2.15. A link to the completed study will appear here when available.

Author
Nassul Kabunga, Tewodaj Mogues, Bjorn van Campenhout, Haroon Sseguya
Institutional affiliations
None specified
Grant-holding institution
None specified
Country
Uganda
Region
Sub-Saharan Africa (includes East and West Africa)
Sector
None specified
Subsector
Community Action Program, Anti-corruption/ Governance, Decentralization
Gender analysis
 
Subsector
Community Action Program, Anti-corruption/ Governance, Decentralization
Gender analysis
 
Equity Focus
None specified
Evaluation design
Randomised Control Trials (RCT), Mixed Methods
Status
Ongoing 3ie Funded Studies
3ie Funding Window
Policy Window Round 2

Methodology

This study proposes a mixed methods approach, using sufficient, representative and temporal datasets, to control for any biases and consistently estimate the impacts of barazas in Uganda. The core of analysis will be based on nested randomized designs to assess effects of barazas at different levels of treatment placement (subcounty versus district) as well as the quantifying the differential impacts of two major components of barazas (information sharing versus deliberation). Results of this study will be disseminated in several outlets and will be used to inform policy on the effectiveness of barazas and other related governance tools on service delivery and accountability.

About this impact evaluation

This study is proposed to rigorously evaluate the impacts of the community advocacy forums (or baraza) initiative in Uganda.

Barazas were introduced in Uganda in 2010 as an empowerment tool to enhance citizens’ involvement in monitoring and holding the government accountable for service delivery in relation to the resources spent. In addition, barazas provide the opportunity for citizens to ask questions to their leaders and deliberate among themselves, ultimately contributing to effective monitoring, accountability and transparency among all stakeholders. With barazas, citizens in particular have the opportunity to participate in the development cycle by directly engaging with service providers, and to demand accountability of the use of public resources. 

Barazas were introduced in Uganda about four years ago as an empowerment tool to enhance citizens’ involvement in monitoring and holding the government accountable for service delivery in relation to the resources spent. As barazas continue to be rolled out beyond the pilot communities, a rigorous impact study of their effectiveness is still outstanding.

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