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Latest blogs

Evidence Dialogues: Improving programming to address gender inequality in fragile contexts

By now, virtually everyone in the development community recognizes the centrality of gender equality in improving lives. Now the question is: how can interventions be designed to effectively move the needle on entrenched gender prejudice?

What is desirable vs. what is feasible: Producing evidence on peacebuilding programming

Measuring the impact of peacebuilding is different than measuring the impact of other types of programs. We should aim for a more evidence-based foreign policy and multilateral interventions, which might be able to propel us to new levels of global peace.

On World Food Day, think once more about food systems, instead of just deciding what to eat today

Every time you sit down for a meal, you are part of a food system—the chain from production through distribution to your plate and disposal of leftovers. Most of the time, people only focus on the near end of that chain: what to eat today.

Why we need qualitative evidence in systematic reviews: the case of the Gender SR

We recently completed a new systematic review, ‘Strengthening women’s empowerment and gender equality in fragile contexts towards peaceful and inclusive societies’. This systematic review, also called the Gender SR, examined 14 gender-specific and gender-transformative interventions focusing on women’s empowerment in fragile contexts.

Evaluation approaches to scaling – application and lessons

In the second blog of his two-part series, 3ie Senior Research Fellow Johannes Linn builds on the discussion in Part I around the factors that support and hinder the scaling process and pathway. In this piece, he writes about both quantitative and qualitative evidence-based evaluation of scaling efforts and the practical application of these approaches.

Evidence impact: informing better monitoring and measurement of interventions

How helpful can an evaluation be if it shows an intervention had no effects on desired outcomes? The first evaluation of a community-driven reconstruction (CDR) program called Tuungane, implemented in the Democratic Republic of Congo, is one such study. The evaluation did not show positive effects on all desired social and behavioural outcomes, but it did help the implementer, International Rescue Committee (IRC), revamp some of its systems.

About

Evidence Matters is 3ie’s blog. It primarily features contributions from staff and board members. Guest blogs are by invitation.

3ie publishes blogs in the form received from the authors. Any errors or omissions are the sole responsibility of the authors. Views expressed are their own and do not represent the opinions of 3ie, its board of commissioners or supporters.

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