Impact of unconditional cash transfers: a replication study of the short-term effects in Kenya

Impact of unconditional cash transfers: a replication study of the short-term effects in Kenya

3ie Replication paper 20, 2019

Hongmei Wang, Fang Qiu, Jiangtao Luo

Wang and colleagues replicate the results of a randomized evaluation carried out by Haushofer and Shapiro in 2016. The original study used randomization to examine the overall effects of a large unconditional cash transfer program. The original study also examined the differential effects of transfer magnitude (large versus small), transfer recipient (husband versus wife), and transfer timing (monthly versus lump sum) across eight domains including assets, revenue, expenditure, food security, health, education, psychological well-being and female empowerment. Households receiving unconditional cash transfers had higher household consumption, asset holding, monthly income, and better food security and psychological well-being. While lump sum transfers led to higher levels of asset holdings, monthly payments were more likely than lump sum transfers to increase food security. Large cash transfers increased asset holdings and improved psychological well-being more than small cash transfers.

The replication researchers conducted a push-button replication, a pure replication, and then extended their analysis to examine model validation and model specifications. The replication results were consistent with the findings from the original study. The short-term impacts of unconditional cash transfers on household consumption, assets, income, food security and psychological well-being were sustained when conducting robustness checks using a variety of methods as well as different model specifications. The principal component analysis on measuring the indices, however, suggested further examination of alternative measures of food security, health and psychological well-being.

Biometric Smartcards and payment disbursement: a replication study of a state capacity-building experiment in India

Biometric Smartcards and payment disbursement: a replication study of a state capacity-building experiment in India

Replication paper 3ie 2019
The National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme and Social Security Pension are two of the largest employment programmes in Andhra Pradesh. Muralidharan and colleagues (2016) investigated the impacts of biometrically-authenticated payment infrastructure (Smartcards) on beneficiaries of the two employment programmes.

Risk sharing and transaction costs: a replication study of evidence from Kenya’s mobile money revolution

Risk sharing and transaction costs: a replication study of evidence from Kenya’s mobile money revolution

Replication paper 3ie 2019
This replication study starts with the twin strategies of push-button and pure replications of the original study. It then followed this up with various consistency and robustness checks, such as propensity score matching and the Tobit model specification.

Cash and change: a replication study of a cash transfer experiment in Malawi

Cash and change: a replication study of a cash transfer experiment in Malawi

Replication paper 3ie 2019
Maira Reimão conducted a replication of a 2011 study, Cash or condition? Evidence from a cash transfer experiment, by Baird and colleagues, which is one of the few studies that empirically compares the impact of unconditional cash transfers to that of conditional cash transfers.

3ie Replication paper 18

Savings revisited: a replication study of a savings intervention in Malawi

Replication paper 3ie 2018

Jesper Stage and Tharshini Thangavelu replicate the results of a randomized evaluation carried out by Lasse Brune and colleagues in 2016 in Malawi.

RPS19

Mobile money and its impact on improving living conditions in Niger: a replication study

Replication paper 3ie

Edmundo Beteta and colleagues replicate the results of a randomized evaluation carried out by Aker and colleagues in 2016 in Niger.