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Group think – taking stock of the evidence on group-based livelihood programmes

Mobilizing the poor in low-income countries into groups to deliver livelihoods interventions has become a favoured approach in the development community to address poverty.

What works to improve school enrollment and attendance? Cash.

In 2018, one in six of the world's school-aged children — more than 258 million kids —were not in school, according to UNESCO. And as that data shows, progress in increasing attendance has slowed dramatically, with the proportion of children who do not attend primary school barely budging in the last decade.

Launching a campaign- 2020 hindsight: what works in development?

Today we are launching, at 3ie, a yearlong social media campaign called ‘2020 Hindsight: What Works in Development.’ For our non-American readership, let me briefly explain where the idiom ‘Hindsight is 20/20’ comes from. 20/20 vision is a term used to express that you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance.

External validity: policy demand is there but research needs to boost supply

A randomised controlled trial (RCT) in a Northern district of Uganda finds that the young adults who receive cash transfers use it to buy more food for their families, football shirts, and airtime for their mobile phones, compared to those in control areas. Would the pattern be the same if young adults in central Uganda are given cash transfers? Would the findings replicate if the cash transfers were given to young women in Senegal? This stylised example points to the crucial question of generalisability of program impacts to other contexts – commonly referred to as external validity.

Sounds good... but what will it cost? Making the case for rigorous costing in impact evaluation research

Imagine two government programs—a job training program and a job matching program—that perform equally well in terms of boosting employment outcomes. Now think about which is more cost-effective. If your answer is ‘no idea’ you’re not alone! Most of the time, we don’t have the cost evidence available to discern this important difference.

The tricky business of measuring latrine use: lessons from 3ie’s evidence programme

There has been a fair bit of hoopla around India being declared open defecation free last month.  In the media debates, the measurement of India’s open defecation-free status has come under a good deal of scrutiny. Leaving aside the politics of the debate, there remains an important question: how can latrine use be measured rigorously?

About

Evidence Matters is 3ie’s blog. It primarily features contributions from staff and board members. Guest blogs are by invitation.

3ie publishes blogs in the form received from the authors. Any errors or omissions are the sole responsibility of the authors. Views expressed are their own and do not represent the opinions of 3ie, its board of commissioners or supporters.

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