Voluntary Male Medical Circumcision Evidence Programme

It is widely recognised that preventive measures are crucial in tackling the HIV epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa. Three randomised controlled trials and numerous observational studies have shown that male circumcision reduces HIV acquisition by approximately 60 per cent for men, suggesting that efforts to increase male circumcision can play a significant role in HIV prevention. While several programmes have focused on increasing the prevalence of male circumcision programmes and health care facilities to provide these services, progress in this area has been modest. 3ie supported seven pilot interventions and their impact evaluations to generate evidence on what works to increase demand.

Thomas Mandlmeier, Deutsche Welle

To help inform the design of this evidence programme, 3ie published a scoping report on interventions to increase the demand for voluntary medical male circumcision. The report provides an overview of the interventions implemented in 14 Sub-Saharan African countries to increase uptake of medical male circumcision and the available evidence on the effectiveness of these interventions. This programme was designed in coordination with and with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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Rapid, minimally invasive adult voluntary male circumcision: A randomised trial of Unicirc, a novel disposable device

Impact evaluation 2014

Publication type: Journal article
Author: P. S. Millard, H. R. Wilson, N. D. Goldstuck, C. Anaso
Sector: Health Nutrition and Population

IEb23

Exploring the impacts of providing economics incentives to increase voluntary medical male circumcision

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016
This brief is based on two 3ie-funded pilot interventions in Kenya and South Africa that use economic incentives to evaluate if they increase VMMC uptake. The two studies used different forms of economic incentives with slightly different conditions to receive them.

IEb21

Do lottery-based incentives help increase voluntary medical male circumcision?

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016
This brief is based on two 3ie-funded pilot interventions in Kenya and Tanzania. These studies were conducted to determine whether men aged 20–39 years responded to material incentives like smartphones or bicycles allocated through a lottery.

IEb22

Can peers and other influencers increase voluntary medical male circumcision uptake?

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016
This brief is based on findings from four 3ie-funded pilot interventions in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Zambia and Uganda that used role models, peers, partners and normative attitudes to evaluate whether or not these influencers had a positive impact on VMMC uptake. The impact evaluations summarised in this brief showed mixed results.

Assessing the impact of delivering messages through intimate partners to create demand for voluntary medical male circumcision in Uganda

Assessing the impact of delivering messages through intimate partners to create demand for voluntary medical male circumcision in Uganda

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016

This study evaluates whether an information-based, partner-mediated intervention through pregnant mothers in the third trimester significantly increased demand for VMMC among their male partners in

Voluntary medical male circumcision uptake through soccer in Zimbabwe

Voluntary medical male circumcision uptake through soccer in Zimbabwe

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016

This study assessed whether a 60-minute soccer-themed educational session led by a trained coach increased the demand for male circumcision among adolescent students in secondary schools in Bulaway

IEb23

Exploring the impacts of providing economics incentives to increase voluntary medical male circumcision

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016
This brief is based on two 3ie-funded pilot interventions in Kenya and South Africa that use economic incentives to evaluate if they increase VMMC uptake. The two studies used different forms of economic incentives with slightly different conditions to receive them.

IEb21

Do lottery-based incentives help increase voluntary medical male circumcision?

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016
This brief is based on two 3ie-funded pilot interventions in Kenya and Tanzania. These studies were conducted to determine whether men aged 20–39 years responded to material incentives like smartphones or bicycles allocated through a lottery.

IEb22

Can peers and other influencers increase voluntary medical male circumcision uptake?

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016
This brief is based on findings from four 3ie-funded pilot interventions in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Zambia and Uganda that used role models, peers, partners and normative attitudes to evaluate whether or not these influencers had a positive impact on VMMC uptake. The impact evaluations summarised in this brief showed mixed results.

Assessing the impact of delivering messages through intimate partners to create demand for voluntary medical male circumcision in Uganda

Assessing the impact of delivering messages through intimate partners to create demand for voluntary medical male circumcision in Uganda

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016

This study evaluates whether an information-based, partner-mediated intervention through pregnant mothers in the third trimester significantly increased demand for VMMC among their male partners in

Voluntary medical male circumcision uptake through soccer in Zimbabwe

Voluntary medical male circumcision uptake through soccer in Zimbabwe

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016

This study assessed whether a 60-minute soccer-themed educational session led by a trained coach increased the demand for male circumcision among adolescent students in secondary schools in Bulaway

The use of peer referral incentives to increase demand for voluntary medical male circumcision in Zambia

The use of peer referral incentives to increase demand for voluntary medical male circumcision in Zambia

Impact evaluation 3ie 2016

This study evaluates the effectiveness of a pilot intervention conducted in Zambia that provided small financial incentives to circumcision clients who successfully referred their peers to also see

There are no systematic reviews
There are no evidence gap maps
There are no replication studies