Using mixed methods to strengthen process and impact evaluation

As necessary as conventional quantitative methods might be, the importance of adopting a mixed-methods approach in order to understand and answer complex development questions cannot be overemphasized. This blog is the second of a two-part series by 3ie Senior Research Fellow Michael Bamberger in which he offers detailed guidance on how to design, implement and utilize mixed-methods evaluations.

Three ways theories of change are helping evaluate a complex initiative to improve waste pickers’ lives

Urban waste pickers face several intertwined challenges such as low incomes, limited education, poor health, social marginalization, and domestic violence. In Bengaluru, India, 3ie is currently evaluating an initiative called Saamuhika Shakti, which adopts an innovative ‘Collective Impact’ approach to improving the lives of informal waste pickers. The initiative, just like the problems it looks to address, is complex.

Importance of mixed-methods approaches in development research and evaluation

As necessary as conventional quantitative methods might be, the importance of adopting a mixed-methods approach in order to understand and answer complex development questions cannot be overemphasized. In the first blog of this two-part series, 3ie Senior Research Fellow Michael Bamberger explains how an integrated mixed-methods approach goes much beyond incorporating just a few tools from both the quantitative and qualitative traditions and why that is more effective for addressing real-world problems.

In the fast-growing field of food systems impact evaluations, a shift toward evaluating consumer behaviour

As we've noted before on this blog, the world faces a critical need to revamp its food systems to provide healthy diets for a growing global population within the planetary boundaries. Making these changes means policymakers need to know what interventions work, for whom, and at what cost – and the state of knowledge about that question is changing rapidly.

How to design and use a process evaluation

3ie’s recently-published working paper ‘Incorporating process evaluation into impact evaluation – What, why and how’ by Senior Research Fellows Vibecke Dixon and Michael Bamberger lays down guidelines that provide impact evaluators tools and ideas for exploring and adding relevant elements of process evaluations to experimental and quasi-experimental impact evaluation designs.

What does the evidence on energy efficiency say? Results from a systematic review and evidence gap map

In November 2021, the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow proposed ambitious goals to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees C, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 45 percent by 2030 compared to 2010 levels, and achieve net-zero emissions by 2050. Energy consumption is the largest source of global GHG emissions, and energy efficiency has great potential to reduce energy demand and use.

How process evaluation can help improve program design and implementation

3ie’s recently-published working paper ‘Incorporating process evaluation into impact evaluation – What, why and how’ by Senior Research Fellows Vibecke Dixon and Michael Bamberger lays down the guidelines that can provide impact evaluators with tools and ideas for exploring and adding relevant elements of process evaluations to experimental and quasi-experimental impact evaluation designs.

Evidence Dialogues: How to set up development institutions so evidence informs policy

One year ago, a group of experts on a 3ie panel agreed that simply producing evidence and data was not sufficient for learning. On Friday, 3ie’s Executive Director, Marie Gaarder, invited those experts back to her virtual table to share what they've learned about how to set up processes within development institutions so that good evidence is not just generated but incorporated into the project planning cycle.

Applications of nighttime light data in international development research

The increasing availability of remotely-sensed measurements of nighttime light intensity across space and time opens the door to new possibilities to understand how the Earth is changing. These insights can improve decision-making to guide policy, deliver services, and improve governance in near real-time. However, accelerated human modifications of the landscape and human activities are profoundly affecting the processes on the Earth's surface, both locally and globally, creating a variety of challenges for scientists and policymakers in understanding global change and its repercussions.

Mapping the impact of urbanization on vegetation in Nairobi, the 'green city in the sun’

In August 2021, 3ie and New Light Technologies co-led a series of capacity-building workshops with 10 researchers from the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC) on the potential to use remotely-sensed geospatial data for impact evaluation. This blog is the third in a series of four in which workshop participants reflect on the uses of remotely-sensed and geospatial data.